Liver Disease Symptoms In Women

Liver disease symptoms in women – No pms symptoms before period.

Liver Disease Symptoms In Women

liver disease symptoms in women

    liver disease

  • The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. It has a wide range of functions, including detoxification, protein synthesis, and production of biochemicals necessary for digestion.
  • (Liver diseases) Hepato-biliary diseases affect the liver and/or biliary tract, and are studied in the branch of medicine called Hepatology.
  • a disease affecting the liver

    symptoms

  • A sign of the existence of something, esp. of an undesirable situation
  • (symptom) (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
  • Symptoms is a 1974 British horror film directed by Jose Ramon Larraz. It was entered into the 1974 Cannes Film Festival. Although circulated privately through bootlegs, the original prints are missing, and was last show on British television in 1983.
  • A physical or mental feature that is regarded as indicating a condition of disease, particularly such a feature that is apparent to the patient
  • (symptom) anything that accompanies X and is regarded as an indication of X’s existence

    women

  • An adult human female
  • (woman) a female person who plays a significant role (wife or mistress or girlfriend) in the life of a particular man; “he was faithful to his woman”
  • (woman) charwoman: a human female employed to do housework; “the char will clean the carpet”; “I have a woman who comes in four hours a day while I write”
  • A female worker or employee
  • (woman) an adult female person (as opposed to a man); “the woman kept house while the man hunted”
  • A wife, girlfriend, or lover

liver disease symptoms in women – The First

The First Year: Cirrhosis: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
The First Year: Cirrhosis: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
More than 25 million Americans and 92 million worldwide suffer from liver disease and cirrhosis, a degenerative and potentially fatal condition in which liver cells are damaged and then replaced by scar tissue, impeding liver function. The disease is most commonly caused by excessive alcohol consumption, hepatitis, or complications from prescription drugs. Immediately after his diagnosis, James Dickerson set out to educate himself on all of his options — and found there is hope for recovery. Now, he offers The First Year: Cirrhosis, the first guide for patients and their families to understanding and managing this chronic condition. In clear, accessible language, the book walks readers step-by-step through everything they need to do each day of the first week after a cirrhosis diagnosis, each subsequent week of the first month, and the following eleven months of the crucial first year. From understanding causes to coping with complications, The First Year: Cirrhosis provides medically-sound, empathetic guidance. The book includes advice on treating symptoms, extending longevity, managing stress, and getting the best care possible for anyone affected by this condition.

More than 25 million Americans and 92 million worldwide suffer from liver disease and cirrhosis, a degenerative and potentially fatal condition in which liver cells are damaged and then replaced by scar tissue, impeding liver function. The disease is most commonly caused by excessive alcohol consumption, hepatitis, or complications from prescription drugs. Immediately after his diagnosis, James Dickerson set out to educate himself on all of his options — and found there is hope for recovery. Now, he offers The First Year: Cirrhosis, the first guide for patients and their families to understanding and managing this chronic condition. In clear, accessible language, the book walks readers step-by-step through everything they need to do each day of the first week after a cirrhosis diagnosis, each subsequent week of the first month, and the following eleven months of the crucial first year. From understanding causes to coping with complications, The First Year: Cirrhosis provides medically-sound, empathetic guidance. The book includes advice on treating symptoms, extending longevity, managing stress, and getting the best care possible for anyone affected by this condition.

poor lil sick kitty

poor lil sick kitty
I’m taking a little 365 break, but just wanted to check in with you all. Its been a crazy week with my show opening, friends visiting, and then Tallulah getting sick. My main focus right now is to get this little kitty better, and so photography has fallen by the wayside.

I know those of you on Twitter know, but Tallulah hasn’t been feeling well the last couple of weeks. She hasn’t been eating as much as she should so I took her to the vet last Monday and they ran a bunch of tests on her ($1200, yikes!). When I went in the next day for the results, the vet said she had a very low white blood cell count which he thinks is FIV (feline AIDS).

I have a document saying T was tested for FIV as a kitten and was negative, but she came from a really shady rescue agency (the woman who ran it was arrested the year after I adopted T because they found over 100 dead cats in her yard – clearly she had taken on too much). Tallulah’s brother died of FIV a couple of years ago, but we assumed he had caught it from a sickly stray my roommate took in after I (and Tallulah) had moved out and gone on tour. I have to assume Tallulah was born with the disease since she has never been outdoors unsupervised and has never interacted with other cats. Usually its outdoor cats that contract FIV as you get it through bites from another infected cat.

The immediate concern for me is to get her eating again. Her ultrasound showed some fat on her liver which is a result of not eating (and if it progresses it will kill her), so I am trying everything and anything to get this cat to eat. Yesterday I started force feeding her with a syringe, which she is actually accepting and not really fighting, so I’m hoping by feeding her this way for a little while, it helps to increase her appetite. She is still eating a tiny bit on her own.

Otherwise she seems okay – she’s sleeping a lot, but is still affectionate and purring, and will play when played with. She’s not hiding or creeping around or showing any signs of pain.

I just can’t believe that if she’s been FIV+ since birth that she is only now exhibiting symptoms – even after 3 years of traveling, she never once got sick until now.

She is on a two week course of antibiotics and after that I am going to take her to another vet for a more definitive FIV test – also hoping they can steer me in the right direction in terms of what foods and vitamins will help her live a long life.

And hopefully she starts eating on her own soon.

I love this cat more than anything. She needs to get better. Please keep her in your thoughts and prayers!

And if you are an owner of an FIV+ cat and have any advice, I would love to hear it! Also, many of you have given me suggestions on foods and other ideas to increase her appetite – keep them coming, and thank you!

Poole Hospital World Hepatitis Day

Poole Hospital World Hepatitis Day
Hazel and Tracy from the RBH liver clinic.
It never ceases to amaze me at the number of people who recoil or pull a face when asked if they want a leaflet regarding hepatitis, even one of the hospital vicars couldn’t get away quick enough. They think that they are immune.
On the other hand you can easily spot those who somehow have become aware of the need to be tested. Middle aged woman who, having had a cesarean in the 70s and were given blood now realise that they may well be infected.
Last year I met someone who was advised by the blood doning clinic that she couldn’t give blood because she had hepatitis B but not to worry just to remember that in future she could not give blood……That was in 1984, so for 26 years she was walking around with HBv and most likely infected in 1970 when she had a transfusion following a cesarean. Trouble is, there are no symptoms and many of the problems following infection are attributed to something else.

Do yourself and your family the biggest favour, get tested. It could be better than a lottery win.

liver disease symptoms in women

Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System (Sherlock Diseases of the Liver)
Following a Tradition of Excellence
from reviews of previous editions:
“the best source of synthesized clinical wisdom” – Gastroenterology
“a tour de force in terms of knowledge and effort” –The New England Journal of Medicine
“the foremost liver book in the world” – The Journal of the American Medical Association
“beautifully produced” – Hepatology
Over the past 56 years, thousands of physicians have depended on Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System. Its didactic and reliable clinical guidance was – and still is – beyond comparison.
This brand-new edition, now named Sherlock’s Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System, after the late Professor Dame Sheila Sherlock, continues to provide concise clinical guidance for all those treating patients with hepato-biliary disease.
Enabling clinicians to formulate incisive diagnoses and appropriate treatment strategies, this book has been updated to reflect the advances that have been made in the last 10 years, providing didactic and reliable clinical guidance in hepatology from the world’s leading experts.
A consistent chapter structure allows readers to access the information immediately, with summary boxes and key learning points throughout, and special emphasis on the latest in evidence-based clinical guidance. And for the first time, this edition now offers a free companion website providing the 680 full-color illustrations and figures in the book, for use in scientific presentations.